Pacific Symphony’s Music Director Carl St.Clair discusses our late February program. Tchaikovsky’s dazzling violin concerto is a test of skill for any violinist, but Vadim Gluzman, who performed Brahms last season in Orange County, is up to the task. In only eight minutes, Barber’s Adagio for Strings will take listeners from the depths of sadness to the heights of joy. And we’ll hear two exciting premieres from Michael Daugherty, including a musical fantasy on the radio broadcasts of Arturo Toscanini conducting the NBC Symphony in NBC Studio 8-H in New York City’s Rockefeller Center (1937-54).

CARL ST.CLAIR - conductor
Vadim Gluzman - violin
Paul Jacobs - organ

Daughery: The Gospel According to Sister Aimee (2012) for Organ, Brass and Percussion (World premiere)
Barber: Adagio for Strings
Daugherty: Radio City (2011) Symphonic Fantasy on Arturo Toscanini and the NBC Symphony Orchestra in America (American premiere)
Tchaikovsky: Violin Concerto

For tickets visit our pacificsymphony.org.

And The Audience Favorite of Joachim’s Four German Violin Concertos is….

Pacific Symphony Associate Concertmaster Paul Manaster was in the lobby playing excerpts from Joseph Joachims four German violin concertos

Well, it depends on which night you ask, but Beethoven was the overall winner, though Mendelssohn won on his 203rd birthday Friday night.

During our February 2-4, 2012 performances of Max Bruch’s Violin Concerto No. 1 in G minor with violinist Nicola Benedetti and guest conductor conductor Christoph König, Pacific Symphony Associate Concertmaster Paul Manaster was in the lobby playing excerpts from Joseph Joachim’s four German violin concertos.  Patrons in the lobby were asked to vote for their favorite.

The Four Concertos were:
Ludwig van Beethoven: Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 61 
Felix Mendelssohn: Violin Concerto in E minor, Op. 64
Max Bruch: Violin Concerto No. 1 in G minor, Op. 26
Johannes Brahms: Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 77 

These are the results:

Thursday, February 2:
Beethoven: 33.7%
Mendelssohn: 28.3%
Brahms: 23%
Bruch:15%

Friday, February 3:
Mendelssohn: 30.2%
Beethoven: 28.8%
Bruch: 24.6%
Brahms: 16.4%

Saturday, February 4:
Beethoven: 32%
Mendelssohn: 28.5%
Bruch: 20%
Brahms: 19.5%

Final Results:
Beethoven: 31.5%
Mendelssohn: 29%
Bruch: 19.9%
Brahms: 19.6%

Vote For Your Favorite of Joachim’s “Four German Violin Concertos”

Joseph Joachim's Four German Violin Concertos

Join us on February 2-4, 2012 for a performance by Nicola Benedetti of Max Bruch’s Violin Concerto No. 1 in G minor with Pacific Symphony, led by conductor Christoph König.  Stop by early in the lobby where Associate Concertmaster Paul Manaster will be playing excerpts from Joseph Joachim’s four German violin concertos and then vote for your favorite.  Results will be posted on this tumblr page!  If you can’t make it to a concert, feel free to respond with your top pick in the comments below.

Also on the program is Debussy’s Petite Suite and Beethoven’s Fourth Symphony. For tickets, please visit our www.pacificsymphony.org.

Joseph Joachim and “The Four German Violin Concertos”

“The Germans have four violin concertos. The greatest, most uncompromising is Beethoven’s. The one by Brahms vies with it in seriousness. The richest, the most seductive, was written by Max Bruch. But the most inward, the heart’s jewel, is Mendelssohn’s.”

-Joseph Joachim

Joseph Joachim (18311907)

Joseph Joachim (1831–1907) was one of the most important 19th century violin virtuosos. At twelve-years-old, he performed Beethoven’s violin concerto under the baton of Felix Mendelssohn, helping to popularize the work which had been neglected up until then. He also studied Mendelssohn’s famous concerto with the author and was the second person to ever play it. Several famous composers wrote concertos for Joachim. These include Johannes Brahms, Max Bruch, Antonín Dvořák and Robert Schumann, though he never performed the latter two. He was a good friend of Brahms, championed his music and advised him when composing his famous violin concerto. Joachim also helped Bruch revise the concerto Pacific Symphony is playing this week.

Pacific Symphony’s Recent Performance History
of Joseph Joachim’s “Four German Violin Concertos”

Ludwig van Beethoven: Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 61 (1806)
January 13-15, 2011 – Pinchas Zukerman (soloist & conductor)

Felix Mendelssohn: Violin Concerto in E minor, Op. 64 (1838-44)
September 22-25, 2011 – Sarah Chang & Carl St.Clair

Max Bruch: Violin Concerto No. 1 in G minor, Op. 26 (1866)
February 2-4, 2012 – Nicola Benedetti & Christoph König

Johannes Brahms: Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 77 (1878)
April 16-18, 2009 – Sarah Chang & Carl St.Clair

For tickets for Pacific Symphony, led by conductor Christoph König performing Max Bruch’s Violin Concerto No. 1 in G minor with violinist Nicola Benedetti on February 2-4, 2012, visit our website.

Inside In - Beethoven and Benedetti

Pacific Symphony’s Music Director Carl St.Clair discusses the first of our February classical concerts.  One of the most enduring violin concertos in the repertoire, Bruch’s masterpiece soars in the inspired hands of captivating young virtuoso Nicola Benedetti. Debussy’s Petite Suite, written for four-hand piano, will be played in its orchestral arrangement. Under renowned conductor Christoph Koenig, Beethoven’s sublime and lyrical Symphony No. 4 is both profound and quietly joyous.

CHRISTOPH KOENIG - conductor
Nicola Benedetti - violin

Debussy: Petite Suite
Bruch: Violin Concerto No. 1
Beethoven: Symphony No. 4

For tickets visit our website.